Finding Evidence of Data Exfil – USBStor artefacts

Readers!

Last year one of the member on SANS DFIR posted a question with regards to identifying whether there was any data leakage occurred in the environment via a USB thumb drive. As for the evidence investigator had USBStor artefacts. Shell bag analysis(TZ Works sbag) showed a large number of files touched (reg-UTC) within a very short time period and a few with the MRU (Most recently used list) flag set with different times.

This blog is a concise article of the tips provided by myself and other members. Provided tips assisted the investigator to support the theory of data leakage.

  1. Evaluating USB dates as a group.  If any number of artefacts is detected with the same exact time stamp, investigate it further. Having such artefacts indicates that they were somehow modified. It is also, worth the effort to carve the data for deleted registry files and look for relevant keys there.
  2. Normal users will/may access the files again after copying to any removable media to make sure the files were copied correctly and are not corrupted. This operation leaves shell items in the form of shell bags and link (.lnk) files. One can use Windows Time Rule to for evidence of file copy. Using the time rule examine the link files with target data pointing to files on removable media (tz works ‘lp’ is excellent for this). If the modified date of the target file data in the link file precedes the created date of the target file data in the link file, then this is an indication that the file was opened from the removable media, after the file was copied to the removable media. This means that even without access to the removable media, you can state that files were copied to the removable media and then they were opened from the removable media. The created date of the target data in the link file is when the file was copied to the removable media. One can state that the files were copied, but cannot state where the file was copied from, as that is not tracked.
  3. Now to determine when the file was opened from the removable media, look at the times of the link file itself. The created date of the link files will be the first time the file was opened and the modified date of the link file will be last time the file was opened. To discover the removable media, locate the volume serial number of the removable media’s file system which will be stored in the link file’s data. Correlate the volume serial number to the data from your USB drive analysis and you will get the manufacturers unique serial number for that removable media. Find that unique serial number across your enterprise and you will discover other machines where that drive was connected to. Correlate the link file target data to the shell bag data and you should be able to get a neat timeline of what happened on the system.
  4. Memory analysis of the system can assist. If the files were copied it should have data on the clipboard. Drag and drop will not likely have any artefacts.
  5. Registry hives –  one can use FTK registry viewer for ease. Usbstor have last written values – dates when the last device was accessed or connected.
  6. Look at the recent files in Windows section. Although if one is not able to open the file it may show which file from which volume – it may not prove that file was copied however if the document name is ‘organisationconfidential‘ than you can argue what was the file doing on USB? The link files should also contain volume serial that one can match/compare with removable media serials.
  7. Registry restore points can also be used to check last written dates.
  8. Look at the MFT records – they have sourceMFT and destinationMFT.

Tools mentioned : SBE – Shellbag Explorer and MFTparser

Links mentioned :

https://files.sans.org/summit/Digital_Forensics_and_Incident_Response_Summit_2015/PDFs/PlumbingtheDepthsShellBagsEricZimmerman.pdf

 

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